Thursday, September 10, 2009

Fashion Disaster

Attention: Walmart Shoppers...


this outfit brings out the animal in some people.

Brian Burke is still after Phil Kessel


The hockey news is buzzing with news that Brian Burke is going to provide Bruin's restricted free agent Phil Kessel with an offer sheet. The speculation came about because the Leafs made a trade on the weekend to reacquire their 2010 2nd round pick from Chicago. The NHL Collective Bargaining Agreement requires compensation for signing restricted free agents in the form of draft picks. The higher the value of the contract signed, the more picks that must be handed over.

Here are the offer sheet compensation tables:

$994,433 or below None
Over $994,433 to $1,506,716 3rd round choice
Over $1,506,716 to $3,013,434 2nd round choice
Over $3,013,434 to $4,520,150 1st round and 3rd round choice
Over $4,520,150 to $6,026,867 1st round, 2nd round and 3rd round choice
Over $6,026,867 to $7,533,584 Two 1st round choices, one 2nd and one 3rd round choice
Over $7,533,584 Four 1st round choices

A team must own the draft picks before making the offer sheet. The trade gives the appearance that Burke needed that 2nd round pick to sign Kessel. Kessel is looking for about $4.5 million but the Leafs would likely have to go higher to dissuade the Bruins from matching their offer and taking the Leafs' picks instead. And why wouldn't the Bruins just match the Leafs' offer? Well right now the Bruins only have about $1.7 million in cap space so that's a lot of cap space they made need to clear. However, they just might have to find it somehow.

Is Phil Kessel worth it? Many people think so. He is just turning 22 next month and scored 36 goals last season after a disappointing first two seasons in the NHL. Prior to the NHL he was a goal scoring machine for the U.S. National Under-18 team and Boston took him 5th in the 2006 Draft. The Leafs badly need a sniper and perhaps handing over these 3 picks is a smaller price than giving up a 1st round pick and Tomas Kaberle.

Boston GM Peter Chiarelli has said he will match any offer and then make trades to create cap space. Is he bluffing? Or maybe Burke is bluffing about the offer sheet and is only trying to nudge Chiarelli back to the trading table. We will soon find out.

However, not everyone is sold on Kessel. A must-read is the recent blog post by Elliotte Friedman of CBC Sports, who has some strong comments about Kessel's reputation.

Friedman says he is an incredible talent, but an exasperating one.

He's a walking contradiction. An almost total non-talker in public, but phenomenal when it comes to charity efforts in private. A guy who beat testicular cancer, but wouldn't play through last season's shoulder injury until teammates pointed out they were playing through worse.He suggests that the Bruins are concerned about shelling out $4.5 million a year to a player that hasn't bought into the team concept. He are the other points made in the post:

  • Kessel needs a playmaking centre like Marc Savard to succeed.
  • He needs strong teammates around him.
  • He does not respond well to criticism and needs to be treated softly (not quite Ron Wilson's style).
The bottom line is this: It is a mistake to acquire Phil Kessel without proper structure. The structure he already has in Boston.

Will they have to create races for hermaphrodite?


World 800-metre champion Caster Semenya of South Africa has male and female sexual organs, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Friday, posing an ethical and political quandary for world track and field's ruling body.

Medical reports indicate she has no ovaries, but rather has internal male testes, which are producing large amounts of testosterone. You don't see that very often.

On the positive side, this doubles his/her chances of getting a date on a Saturday night.

Girls rescued from fake reality TV show


Nine women were rescued from a home in Turkey recently after being held there in the auspices that they were filming a reality show. Only it wasn’t a reality show; the guys behind it were filming them in the nude and selling it online

According to reports, the organizers of the fake show placed advertisements in newspapers that called for “contestants to compete in a reality show akin to ‘Big Brother’ that will be broadcast on FX TV” and interviewed dozens of would-be contenders.

Nine were told they were chosen and made to sign a contract that stipulated that if any of the participants left before two months were up, they would have to pay a fine of 50,000 Turkish Liras. The young women were also told they would have no contact with the outside world, including their families, for the two-month period. Dreaming of becoming television stars, they accepted all the preconditions.

Cameras set up around the villa recorded every moment and naked videos of the participants were sold on the Internet.

Some of the women, realizing the scam, wanted to get out, but were prevented from doing so by the organizers. A person who stayed at the house with them warned that they would have to pay the fine if they left.

Those who tried to leave anyway found they could not because they were locked inside the villa.

Police were finally called at the weekend by anxious parents who realised their daughters were not being screened on any television programme or TV company website.

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Move over beach volleyball, I want lingerie football


The Lingerie Football League is barely a week into their season, amd I'm ready to declare it a success. Here you have Ellie Cartabiano who tries to execute the LFL’s version of the naked bootleg, but can’t seem to bust out into the open.


The worst Beatles cover ever!

...too painful to listen to the whole thing.

Anti-Semites descend on the TIFF


I don’t always agree with decisions made by Israel but I realize that the country often much choose from some difficult options and satisfy a constituency that represents a broad political and religious spectrum. Israel has existed in a hostile environment since the country was formed 61 years ago. This environment is partly their own doing but also in response to external pressures over which they have no control. As a Jew I have to support Israel although that doesn’t mean I won’t be critical of certain actions.


That brings me to Naomi Klein who last week who joined an international group of more than 50 prominent filmmakers, writers, artists and academics protesting the Toronto International Film Festival’s decision to spotlight the city of Tel Aviv and the work of 10 Israeli filmmakers. Ms. Klein never passes up a chance to dump on Israel. She claims the TIFF’s decision to spotlight Tel Aviv feeds Israel’s foreign policy goals and presents Israeli society as more diverse and open than it actually is.


She is what my late father used to refer to as an anti-Semitic Jew. As a Holocaust survivor he felt these were the same type of Jews that served as kapos in the concentration camps and collaborated with the Nazis to kill other Jews. Maybe my father’s comparison is too harsh. But she never misses an opportunity to use Israel to promote her left wing views and of course sell more books. I think anyone who would align themselves with the likes of Mel Gibson needs to have a good look in the mirror,

Ladies, Michael Bublé is 34 today

Attention: Walmart Shoppers...


Swastika chic

Hump Day Hottie


Mena Suvari

Mug Shot of the Week


I'm just speechless.

Ever wonder what to do with non-gender children?

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

One Hit Wonder

Debby Boone - You Light Up My Life (1977)

OMG! Socialism in the classroom.

President Obama addressed American students and it was a Conservative's worst nightmare.

The President urged students to stay in school, get an education, do their homework, pay attention, focus, and don't spend every waking moment in front of the TV or XBox.

Wait, it gets worse.

He also said, "Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't be afraid to ask for help when you need it. I do that every day. Asking for help isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of strength."

That's subversive, socialist brainwashing right there. We all know seeking help is a sign of weakness. And everyone knows you to look to Jesus for strength.

The outrage from Republicans and scared parents was certainly justified.

Who designs a slide that looks like a giant penis?

THIS IS SOOO WRONG!

Really what would Labour Day without Jerry Lewis

...and the ageless, lip-synching Charo.

The brilliant Sid Caesar is 87

Monday, September 07, 2009

Stanley Kaplan of test prep fame dies

Test-preparation pioneer Stanley Kaplan died last week, 71 years after creating the business in his parents' Brooklyn basement.

The company grew into the nation's largest test-prep business, helping students get ready for college-entrance exams such as the SAT, and in the process blazing a trail for the for-profit education industry.

Anyone who has attended a university or college no doubt has used Kaplan's services to help improve their scores for entrance exams to attend law school, business school, medical school, etc.

Kaplan Inc. was actually sold the Washington Post Co. in 1984. At the time, annual revenue was about $35 million. Last year it rose 15% to $2.33 billion and supported the media company as it deals with an ongoing advertising slump.

Mr. Kaplan used to pay his grammar-school classmates a dime to let him tutor them for coming tests, but his own history with testing and admissions was troubled. He adopted the middle name Henry after a teacher confused him with another student with the same name and gave Mr. Kaplan the wrong grade. In the mid-1930s, he took the New York Board of Regents college-entrance examination, and received a terrible score -- it turned out to be another grading error.

Mr. Kaplan launched his tutoring service after being rejected from five medical schools in the late 1930s, despite graduating second in his class at the City College of New York. Mr. Kaplan attributed the rejections to being Jewish and his public-college pedigree.

The College Board and the nonprofit that develops the SAT, the Educational Testing Service, discouraged test-takers from paying for cramming schools. ETS has stated that it was "appalled by the subversive effect of these commercial enterprises on the goals of education." In 1965, it released a statistical analysis arguing that coaching had no effect on SAT scores.

In the late 1970s, matters came to a head. Mr. Kaplan had advertised that his courses allowed students to increase their scores by an average of 100 points. (The two-part SAT at that time was graded on a scale of 400 to 1600.) The Federal Trade Commission launched a formal investigation of the test-coaching industry, focusing on Kaplan and another business.

In 1979, the FTC sided with Mr. Kaplan. An agency analysis concluded that his program did help "underachievers" raise their SAT scores, by an average of 50 points.

Mug Shot of the Week

Burke is still after Phil Kessel


The hockey news is buzzing with news that Brian Burke is going to provide Bruin's restricted free agent Phil Kessel with an offer sheet. The speculation came about because the Leafs made a trade on the weekend to reacquire their 2010 2nd round pick from Chicago. The NHL Collective Bargaining Agreement requires compensation for signing restricted free agents in the form of draft picks. The higher the value of the contract signed, the more picks that must be handed over.

Here are the offer sheet compensation tables:

$994,433 or below None
Over $994,433 to $1,506,716 3rd round choice
Over $1,506,716 to $3,013,434 2nd round choice
Over $3,013,434 to $4,520,150 1st round and 3rd round choice
Over $4,520,150 to $6,026,867 1st round, 2nd round and 3rd round choice
Over $6,026,867 to $7,533,584 Two 1st round choices, one 2nd and one 3rd round choice
Over $7,533,584 Four 1st round choices

A team must own the draft picks before making the offer sheet. The trade gives the appearance that Burke needed that 2nd round pick to sign Kessel. Kessel is looking for about $4.5 million but the Leafs would likely have to go higher to dissuade the Bruins from matching their offer and taking the Leafs' picks instead. And why wouldn't the Bruins just match the Leafs' offer? Well right now the Bruins only have about $1.7 million in cap space so that's a lot of cap space they made need to clear. However, they just might have to find it somehow.

Is Phil Kessel worth it? Most people think so. He is just turning 22 next month and scored 36 goals last season after a disappointing first two seasons in the NHL. Prior to the NHL he was a goal scoring machine for the U.S. National Under-18 team and Boston took him 5th in the 2006 Draft. The Leafs badly need a sniper and perhaps handing over these 3 picks is a smaller price than giving up a 1st round pick and Tomas Kaberle.

Boston GM Peter Chiarelli has said he will match any offer and then make trades to create cap space. Is he bluffing? Or maybe Burke is bluffing about the offer sheet and is only trying to nudge Chiarelli back to the trading table. We will soon find out.

Happy 22nd birthday Evan Rachel Wood

Happy Labour Day

Russian milk ads




It might be unhealthy


Krispy Kreme Jelly Donut Chicken Sandwich

A fried chicken breast in a jelly filled Krispy Kreme donut with cheese and honey.

Fashion Disaster

Sunday, September 06, 2009

TTC's Lower Bay Street Station

Below the main platform for Bay station is an abondoned platform, which was used for only six months in 1966 when the TTC experimentally ran trains whose routes included portions of both the Yonge-University and Bloor-Danforth lines. This abandoned platform is sometimes referred to as Lower Bay.

The platform was in service from February to September 1966 as part of an ‘interlining’ experiment, in which the TTC ran trains along three routes, with one matching the subsequent Bloor-Danforth line, and the other two combining parts of the Bloor-Danforth line with the Yonge-University line. The experiment was deemed a failure, largely because delays anywhere quickly cascaded to affect the entire system rather than one line. Also, as the stations had not been laid out effectively for cross-platform interchange, trains travelling west from St. George and east from Bay alternated between the two levels, leading passengers to wait on the stairs in-between the levels, since they were unable to tell which platform would receive the next train.

With every station served by at least two routes, passengers could travel between any two stations without changing trains; though for some station combinations, such as travel between a station north of Bloor and one on the Bloor-Danforth route, transferring at Bloor-Yonge station resulted in a more direct path. The TTC found that when the extra time waiting for a train from the correct route was considered, the time savings were not significant.

Interlining was discontinued because of the confusion and delays, although it has been argued that it was politically motivated and that the experiment was sabotaged by the TTC, perhaps even designed to fail from the start. Much of the infrastructure for interlining is still present on the system, and most older stations still have signs informing passengers of each train’s next destination, although they no longer change. While St. George and Bloor-Yonge stations remained operating upper and lower platforms for the two crossing subway lines, Bay station would be served by only the Bloor-Danforth line. Lower Bay was closed to the public.

Lower Bay is now used to train new operators, to move trains between the two current lines, for platform-surface experiments, and to allow filming in the subway without disrupting public service. The station has been modified several times to make it look like a "common" North American subway station, and the TTC once had an elaborate pre-built set for converting it to a New York subway station.

Until recently the station has been closed to the public which has attracted "urban explorers". Toronto's Doors Open event in 2007 included the Lower Bay station and the TTC recently began tours which also includes the station. So for $15 you can go down there and take pictures.

The platform looks much the same as it did back in 1966 though many of the other stations on the University line have since undergone renovations (see Museum station).

The tunnel leading to the Lower Bay station.

The original signs for Bay station also included Yorkville underneath.

You can make out the Grand Central station name which was used for a movie shoot involving the New York subway station.

Here are a bunch of New York subway signs in storage.

Statue of the Week